HOW OFTEN DO YOU EAT OUT?

This is all we needed. Another reason we shouldn't be eating out at fast-food restaurants on the regular.

WHAT NEW RESEARCH SHOWS

According to an article posted in the Washington Post this week, a new study shows that industrial chemicals called phthalates, which are used to make plastics soft, are being found in food samples from some of the most popular fast-food restaurants out there, including McDonald's, Chipotle, and Pizza Hut.  These chemicals have been found to cause some serious health issues, including problems with fertility and reproduction,  disruptions in the Endocrine System, learning issues, and behavior disorders. Could our local fast-food restaurants have the same harmful chemicals? I'm thinking if practices are duplicated all across the country, then the answer is yes.

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THE TESTING

Researchers purchased 64 items from fast-food chains located in San Antonio, Texas including:

  • McDonald's
  • Burger King
  • Pizza Hut
  • Domino's
  • Taco Bell
  • Chipotle

The study found harmful chemicals in the majority of the samples taken.

WHAT DOES THE FDA HAVE TO SAY ABOUT ALL OF THIS?

The FDA said they would review the study and consider the findings as scientific evidence. The FDA also said that they have high safety standards, and when new evidence is presented, they take that into consideration and may end up making changes to protect consumers.

All of the foods that they tested contained some of these chemicals. They also collected plastic gloves which also contained the chemicals.

MAKING MEALS AT HOME

Earlier research showed that people who make their own food have less exposure to these chemicals than people who eat at fast-food restaurants on the regular.

The study included the most popular menu items from the restaurants, and multiple locations of the restaurant chains were studied to have a better look at what is happening across the board.

 

Photos From Oktoberfest 2021 at Schells Brewery in New Ulm, Minnesota

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